Coffee-stained Streets

Imagination is the poetry pouring from reality’s seams.

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Posts tagged "technology"

Designers Who Found Startups

What’s Driving the Movement

Here’s why design is important to the tech world today:

1. As the consumer tech market becomes more crowded, brands and experience design—not just technical capabilities—are becoming critical to success.

2. Innovation is about radical collaboration. The critical mass of combined design, technical, and business skills enables product iteration to happen faster and at a higher resolution.

3. Designer founders have unique skills (not just visual) to understand human needs and discover unarticulated opportunities.

via Co.Design

Productivity and health! An iPad “yoga” app for designers’ hands. With most designers spending over 8 hours a day in a sedentary position, while it won’t help in all of the postural and health areas, this app is a step in the right direction!

(Source: fastcodesign.com)

simplifyyourlife:

OWNERSHIP BECOMES A BURDEN AS TIME GOES BY.

In societies saturated by hyper-consumption, the joy of acquiring, of holding the new object in your hands and knowing with satisfaction that it’s yours, is familiar. Equally recognizable, though, is that creeping anxiety when the sheen starts to fade and your mind gets distracted with a new, better, life-improving version, and at this intersection, ownership becomes a pain, a burden. 
The product’s value becomes outweighed by concerns of maintenance, optimization of use, and finding a good home for your once-loved product, be it through recycling or re-use. This cycle seems to be becoming ever-shorter, especially in the Western world where gadgets rule and electronics are designed to fail, and both people and businesses are developing strategies to deal with the highs and lows of ownership.

This came from a series of articles from Rich Radka called Models of Ownership (Part 1, Part 2 and Part 3). An interesting read.

simplifyyourlife:

OWNERSHIP BECOMES A BURDEN AS TIME GOES BY.

In societies saturated by hyper-consumption, the joy of acquiring, of holding the new object in your hands and knowing with satisfaction that it’s yours, is familiar. Equally recognizable, though, is that creeping anxiety when the sheen starts to fade and your mind gets distracted with a new, better, life-improving version, and at this intersection, ownership becomes a pain, a burden.

The product’s value becomes outweighed by concerns of maintenance, optimization of use, and finding a good home for your once-loved product, be it through recycling or re-use. This cycle seems to be becoming ever-shorter, especially in the Western world where gadgets rule and electronics are designed to fail, and both people and businesses are developing strategies to deal with the highs and lows of ownership.

This came from a series of articles from Rich Radka called Models of Ownership (Part 1, Part 2 and Part 3). An interesting read.

An Accidental, Experimental Masterpiece

We need to remember the value of nothing. It’s like breathing: you can’t inhale all day. We need to learn to make peace with the information we don’t know, to embrace the zeroes, to relearn the pleasures of hunger, need, interruption, restraint. We need to work up our ignorance muscles. We need to organize our internal absences to create meaning. We are responsible, in other words, now and forever, for our own deletionism.

SAM ANDERSON

STEAM Learning

Research shows that infusing art into STEM learning can actually cultivate a culture that embraces science, technology, engineering and math, but with a creative engine to power it all forward. Idit Harel Caperton illustrates that this is not just a hypothesis, but a reality worth embracing. 

STEM learning—that is, education in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics—could well benefit from an infusion of art and design. Adding an A for art to STEM would give our technical and scientific education “some steam,” said my MIT colleague John Maeda…

The possible combination of left brain and right brain processing would allow logical, systematic approaches uninhibited due to the imaginative process instigated by creative pathos. By allowing students to experiment in the realm of video game development, they not only touch all aspects of STEM, but by virtue of the medium, approach the whole affair through the spectacles of an artist.

Teaching students the principles of STEM with a dollop of art integrates procedure that, educationally speaking, is lacking: 

…in another school, Team Furyunleash22, designed a game team members called Paleo Quest. Early in their game design process, these Globaloria students learned to draw their game concepts, videotape the concepts, and test their game structure with future players. Based on the critique they receive on their prototype, Team Furyunleash22 modified their ideas. They learned to move from an idea to drawing a prototype, then to designing an interactive demo that shows how the game will look and work.

Too often, the cocoon of art experimentation exists in a vaccuum. While fun and certainly a fertile ground for making mistakes and thus learning from them, as sophistication in artistic attributes grow, implementing a workflow—moving from sketching, prototyping, and then designing—is an essential element, as of now, only staring to come to fruition.

I’m an advocate in not only teaching knowledge, but also the principles by which that knowledge can blossom. Caperton’s pursuit in turning STEM learning into STEAM learning is one I fully appreciate and I look forward to hearing more about the development of this initiative.

(Source: seedmagazine.com)

Nintendo and Apple stand alone at the top in finding new ways for consumer technology to entertain and inform. And that is because both companies actually put technology second in their design process. What comes first is the consumer experience; for these companies technology is useful only as it allows everyday people to have new experiences.

SETH SCHIESELThe New York Times

(Source: The New York Times)

Evernote Peek

Those guys at Evernote are killing it with their ingenuity and understanding of user experience. Here’s just another fun, yet innovative little app they created utilizing the iPad (a digital experience) with the iPad cover (an analog one.) Entrepreneurs and designers  worth studying.

Creativity is just connecting things. When you ask creative people how they did something, they feel a little guilty because they didn’t really do it, they just saw something. It seemed obvious to them after a while. That’s because they were able to connect experiences they’ve had and synthesize new things. And the reason they were able to do that was that they’ve had more experiences or they have thought more about their experiences than other people.

Unfortunately, that’s too rare a commodity. A lot of people in our industry haven’t had very diverse experiences. So they don’t have enough dots to connect, and they end up with very linear solutions without a broad perspective on the problem. The broader one’s understanding of the human experience, the better design we will have.

Steve Jobs

Seth Godin on the future library

"The next library is filled with so many web terminals there’s always at least one empty. And the people who run this library don’t view the combination of access to data and connections to peers as a sidelight—it’s the entire point.

Wouldn’t you want to live and work and pay taxes in a town that had a library like that? The vibe of the best Brooklyn coffee shop combined with a passionate raconteur of information? There are one thousands things that could be done in a place like this, all built around one mission: take the world of data, combine it with the people in this community and create value.”

The Future of the Library